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American Textile Designer: Alexander Girard

Alexander Girard (May 24, 1907 – 1993) affectionately known as Sandro, was an architect and a textile designer born in New York City to an American mother from Boston and a French-Italian father. He was raised in Florence, Italy. A graduate of the Royal School of Architecture in Rome, Girard refined his skills in both Florence and New York.

Girard is widely known for his contributions in the field of American textile design, particularly through his work for Herman Miller (1952 to 1975), where he created fabrics for the designs of George Nelson and Charles and Ray Eames.

In the mid-1960s, Girard began his design work for Braniff International Airways re-branding – “The end of the plain plane”. This project gave Girard the opportunity to work with textiles, color, and graphics on a grand scale, redesigning everything from the sugar packets to the ticket counters to the color of the planes themselves. He used colors like light and dark blue, beige, ochre, orange, turquoise, and muted yellow to make the planes recognizable from the ground. Italian couturier fashion designer Emilio Pucci designed attendant uniforms.

Girard also designed a line of furniture for Braniff's ticket offices and customer lounges. This furniture was also available to the public by Herman Miller in 1967 and was available for one year only.

www.braniffpages.com
Shortfilm by House Industries on Girard.
More art work for sale at the Treadway Gallery

Saturday, 22.10.2011
08:30 (Cet)

 
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