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Meet Jennifer Rubell

Jennifer Rubell creates participatory large-scale food projects that are a hybrid of performance art, installation art, and happenings.

Tuesday, 27.04.2010
15:45 (Cet)

 
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Jennifer Rubell creates participatory large-scale food projects that are a hybrid of performance art, installation art, and happenings. Often taking place inside a traditional art-world occasion -- gala dinner, opening night, gallery opening – her work deconstructs the meal or ritual, and reshapes it into a series of installations that prompt participants to partake without any instruction or guidance. The installations are often staggering in scale and sensually arresting: one ton of ribs with honey dripping on them from the ceiling; 2,000 hard-boiled eggs with a pile of latex gloves nearby to pick them up; 1,521 doughnuts hanging on a free-standing wall; three mature apple trees, cut down and laid on their sides, their apples on the ground beneath them.

The projects fulfill the essential functions of the event itself while completely ignoring classic order, format and service. The event often unfolds in a series of spaces, through a series of installations that engage with the history of modern and contemporary art while at the same time providing food, drink, and wonder.

Rubell’s previous projects include Creation, for Performa 09, the New York performance-art festival; Reconciliation, at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.; and, since 2001, a yearly breakfast project in the courtyard of the Rubell Family Collection in Miami.

Rubell, 39, received a B.A. from Harvard University in Fine Arts, and subsequently attended the Culinary Institute of America. With her brother, Jason, and her parents, Don and Mera, she created a series of hotels in Miami, including the Albion and Greenview in South Beach and Beach House Bal Harbour. She also wrote a column for five years about cooking and entertaining for the Miami Herald House & Home magazine, followed by another column for five years in Domino magazine. Her writings have appeared in Vogue, the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Travel + Leisure, Food + Wine, Ocean Drive, and Bon Appetit, among others. She is the author of Real Life Entertaining (HarperCollins), a blueprint for a radically simplified way of cooking, entertaining and hosting at home. Rubell lives in New York.





 
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