Qompendium is an evolving and ever-changing platform for philosophy, art, culture and science, represented by a series of print publications: magazines, books and monographs. Furthermore, it is enriched by a gallery concept, a work shop and a fast-moving online portal.


Thomas Jeppe likes Unemployment, but with Pressure!

Thomas Jeppe is a Melbourne-based artist and founder of independent publisher Serps Press. Publications include Home Made Tattoos Rule, Shoot: Photography of the Moment, The Times They Are The Changes. His practice is an ongoing negotiation between publishing, painting, sculpture and photography.  At the time of writing, he is living in Hamburg on an artist residency.  His next public work will be the exhibition The People's Poet at Galerie Conradi, August 2010, and the book Old Men's Tattoos, a pseudo-sequel to Home Made Tattoos Rule (Dokument 2011).

Wednesday, 21.07.2010
16:00 (Cet)

 
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Mitch Beige Brown created this artwork for Thomas Jeppe to alter. This is the result.

Qompendium: Your job in 20 words ...
Thomas Jeppe: Like unemployment, but with pressure.

Your personal style signifier is ...
I am looking for a mass-produced t-shirt with big lettering that says “Personal Style”

How would your girl friend describe you ...
Nice, sometimes interesting.

How would your PA describe you ...
I suppose that a Personal Assistant is actually no different from an Assistant, but it’s likely that Personal Assistant has become a common term because its acronym “PA” is fairly unambiguous, which can’t be said for an “A”.
It’s interesting to consider the recent history of acronyms.  At first they would appear to be a time saving device, but as their usage increased (I am presuming this happened in the ‘80s, probably amongst American professionals), they became a form of privileged language.  In that respect, they are a tool of oppression.

What is the smartest graphic you have ever created?
I once created a logo that smashed the very idea of the word “graphics”, and caused a dramatic about-face in the visual industries.

The first font you would use on any assignment is ...
Doesn’t matter.

The best trick on photoshop is ...
Scanning.

A poster you would hang on your wall ...
Visual history of ecstasy chart? 

The last meal that truly impressed you ...
A strange Turkish cave serving Blumenkohl Brokkoli mit Käsesoße.

The last CD you purchased and would buy again ...
How strange that this question is already anachronistic.  It was only ten years ago that we would take a small stack of Compact Disks with us to house parties as a way of sharing and enjoying music together.  I can’t forget one suburban teenage party where my Tribe Called Quest Compact Disk was stolen, and I held onto the empty cover for years afterwards in the hope it would be returned.  All the significance of this beautiful and mysterious object has completely evaporated.

The graphic that truly impressed you ...
Some super sharp, 1960s melting-rainbow-pseudo-cartoon oil paintings hanging in a seaside bookshop on the west coast of Australia.  I spoke with the owner, and they turned out to be painted in the 1990s by behind-the-scenes Australian graphic design legend Alastair Ardoch Morrison, who was in his 80s at the time he painted them.  I later found out that he was chairman of the board that designed the first Australian decimal currency bank notes.  He was also a vital chronicler of Australian cultural identity through the comical linguistic books in the “Strine” series.

Ancient history thrills you because ...
My understanding is that there was less regulation and more submission to desire.  And more brutality, and more unknowns.  But perhaps I like nostalgia more than I like the past.

The United States is ...
On the surface, desperately trying to remain interesting.

Australia is ...
Very, very young.  As it is the New World project, I feel there is some tension between attempts to rework and honour traditions, and an earnest breaking with history.  Physically removed, mentally connected, culturally laconic...  But, as with everywhere, it has its global citizens, and great invention and humanity. 

Money is ...
Not having money is the great condition for developing resourcefulness.  However, it cannot be denied that some wealthy people have spent a lot of money on some truly impressive things.  In both of these equations, money is definitely the most boring part.

Art is ...
There needs to be a lot more public murals, mainly done by children.  I think it is reasonable to demand that one in every 4 walls would be a public art mural, and three quarters of these must be done by people under the age of 12, and spraypaint is only allowed for those under 7, and the rest must be by paintbrush.

Your ultimate addiction ...
I prefer stories about rising above the shackles of addiction.

A recent discovery of yours is ...
The Hausmeister, where I live, has a full workshop in the basement, and I discovered the key to it.

The books on your bedside table are ...
Margot Fonteyn, Margot Fonteyn
The Art Of Walt Disney, Christopher Finch
Not Made Visible, Matias Faldbakken (Christoph Keller Editions/JRP)
Brief History of Curating, Hans Ulrich Obrist (JRP)
Nijinsky, Sriwhana Spong (Clouds/Michael Lett)
FR David #3, “A is for ‘Orses” (De Appel)
85 Zeichnungen, Stefan Marx (Rollo Press)

The Qompendium Questionnaire Session

For this session two entities are invited to take part.
The first interviewee recommends the next / following interviewee and prepares an art work for him/her to alter.

Art work at the end: Mitch Beige Brown prepared an art work for Thomas Jeppe to alter.

Mitch Beige Brown's questionnaire here.





 
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