Qompendium is an evolving and ever-changing platform for philosophy, art, culture and science, represented by a series of print publications: magazines, books and monographs. Furthermore, it is enriched by a gallery concept, a work shop and a fast-moving online portal.


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to give away- old secretary - for lovers without legs

bruno murani

Art, Design, Artefacts

Bruno Munari
Posted
Friday, 13.06.2014

Bruno Munari (October 24, 1907, Milan – September 30, 1998, Milan) was an Italian artist, designer, and inventor who contributed fundamentals to many fields of visual arts (painting, sculpture, film, industrial design, graphic design) in modernism, futurism, and concrete art, and in non visual arts (literature, poetry) with his research on games, didactic method, movement, tactile learning, kinesthetic learning, and creativity.


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Re:Collection
Posted
Tuesday, 03.06.2014

Re:Collection is a personal and thoughtful project by the design bureau Hofstede, Australia.

Here is what Dominic Hofsede the designer of the project thinks about it: "Re:collection is an online inventory of Australian graphic design, focussed primarily on the period between 1960–1980. Launched in 2009, the site was never intended to be comprehensive, representative or exhaustive. The selection of content is purely subjective; fundamentally it relates to work and individuals I find inspiring, intriguing or influential.

The project was borne out of frustration at the lack of Australian graphic design reference material available, specifically from the decades mentioned above. There is a paucity of books on the subject, a quandary noted by esteemed design commentator Rick Poynor in his excellent article ‘Look inward: graphic design in Australia’ (Eye Magazine 46, 2001). Poynor attributes the deficiency to ‘a tendency for Australian design to underplay itself,’ a modesty that would be understandable if there was, in fact, nothing worthy of acknowledgment. It is my hope and aim that visitors to this site will appreciate that this is not the case."

Website

Art, Design, Artefacts

What makes an Art Capital?

 

How do Dubai, Istanbul, or Hong Kong differ from the “traditional” hubs of London and New York? How can artistic activity and its economic corollaries be encouraged?

Art Dubai director Savita Apte, art critic Louisa Buck, artist Michael Craig-Martin, and Hayward Gallery director Ralph Rugoff discussed the “ingredients” necessary to turn a city into a global art center—one which nurtures and serves a homegrown scene as well as attracting the nomad flock of contemporary art professional aficionados.

Read full article here.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Beau Dick
Posted
Wednesday, 28.05.2014

Beau Dick (born November 23, 1955) is a Canadian Northwest Coast Native artist of Kwakwaka'wakw descent, and is noted as one of the Northwest Coast's most multifaceted, talented carvers. From a young age he was heavily influenced by the traditional carving work of both his grandfather and father, with whom he assisted in carving one of the world’s tallest totem poles in Alert Bay, BC. 

Now, after more than three decades of carving, Beau Dick continues to explore realms beyond that of his own Kwakwaka'wakw culture, mastering the styles of other tribal traditions. Another one of the distinguishing characteristics of his work is the embracing of contemporary, European & Asian influences. In the last decade, his work has been featured in a number of international exhibitions, helping introduce his pieces to a more contemporary audience. Beau's work was featured alongside that of artist Neil Campbell in the 2004 exhibition "Supernatural - Beau Dick and Neil Campbell" at the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver, followed by the 2005 "Totems to Turquoise" exhibit in both New York and Vancouver. In 2009, the McMichael Canadian Art Collection showcased Beau's work in their exhibit entitled "Challenging Traditions: Contemporary First Nations Art of the Northwest Coast". 

Most recently, the story of Beau’s life and art is being developed into a feature-length documentary entitled Meet Beau Dick: Maker of Monsters to be tentatively released in 2014. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia for 2013 – 2014.

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Art, Design, Artefacts

Branden M. Collins
Heart of Glass
Posted
Wednesday, 28.05.2014

Light is meaningful only in relation to darkness, and truth presupposes error. It is these mingled opposites which people our life, which make it pungent, intoxicating. We only exist in terms of this conflict, in the zone where black and white clash.

Leticia Sampedro

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Contemporary Photography: Phillips
Posted
Wednesday, 23.04.2014

Phillips has established a commanding position in the sale of Photographs, Contemporary Art, Design, Editions and Jewelry. Through the passionate dedication of its team of global specialists, Phillips has garnered an unparalleled wealth of knowledge of emerging market trends. Phillips conducts auctions in New York and London and has representative offices throughout Europe and in the United States.  For more information, please visit: phillips.com.

The next ecsastic aution will be held on 8th May 2014 incluing works by Ansel Adams, Guy Bourdin, Man Ray, David Lachapelle, Robert Mapplethorpe, Erwin Blumenfeld, William Eggleston, Ahmet Ertrug, Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Klein, Michel Comte, Herb Ritts, René Burri, Josef Koudelka, Ruud Van Empel and many others.

Phillips is pleased to announce highlights from the forthcoming May Photographs auction, featuring 142 lots with a combined pre-sale estimate of £1,214,800 to £1,722,200


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sculptures, marble, china

Art, Design, Artefacts

Branden Collins
Sculptures by Yang Maoyuan
Posted
Monday, 21.04.2014

Born in 1966 in Dalian, China, sculptural artist Yang Maoyuan alters classical sculpture by a painstaking process of grinding and smoothing to reduce them down to their simplest elements. In Indian thought, the sphere- a three-dimensional embodiment of harmony-was the preferred symbol for the perfect expression of reality. Connected to these Indian thoughts, in Chinese culture, the round is the perfect and not the edge. Yang explores the contrast between Chinese and western classical sculpture; the smoothness and simplicity of polished marble that ultimately becomes reflective, giving a sense of introspection to the viewer vs. the idealized, highly detailed portraiture of Western classical works.

Yang Maoyuan graduated from the Central Institute of Fine Arts, Beijing, China in 1989. Yang lives and works in Beijing, China.

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die, memo, Jessica Charlesworth

Art, Design, Artefacts

Branden Collins
Remember You Will Die
Posted
Tuesday, 01.04.2014

In January 2012, Jessica exhibited The MeMo Organization Cabinet an installation at the Chicago Cultural Center in downtown Chicago as part of the exhibition Morbid Curiosity : The Richard Harris Collection. The installation consists of a cabinet of curious objects and stories that explores a range of poetic practices and attitudes towards death and mourning in relation to developments in science, philosophy and technology. The MeMo Organization is a research-based initiative that recognizes the way cultural shifts have created new relations toward death and experiences. Such change opens the door to more personal, relevant and contemporary experiences of death.

Jessica is a speculative designer with experience working for both public and private sector organisations to explore the future implications of their field. She explores ways of using design to unravel and provoke rich interactions between people, technology, products and services. Whether critiquing science-related themes or exploring how science and technology development affect our attitudes towards death and mortality, Charlesworth’s work addresses fundamental questions about society’s institutions, ambitions and behaviors.

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Art, Design, Artefacts

René Jules Lalique
Posted
Thursday, 20.03.2014

Prestigious Lalique collections are on display all around the world, particularly at the Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon, the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris and the Lalique Museum in Hakone, Japan, whose collections are principally of jewellery by René Lalique. The Musée Lalique in Wingen-sur-Moder has resolved to feature the artist's entire creative output, putting the accent mainly on what is produced by Lalique in Wingen-sur-Moder: glass and crystal.

More information here.

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Art, Design, Artefacts

Prométhée
Posted
Monday, 17.03.2014

Known as the “the father of modern sculpture”, Constantin Brâncuși was a painter, architect and a master of “abstract art”. Through his original work he became one of the most well-known sculptors of the 20th century and Romania’s most famous international artist.

Brancusi’s Prométhée sculpture, a gilded bronze head, was sold at a Sotheby’s auction in New York for some 12.6 million USD on May 2nd, 2012. The work of art was conceived and cast in an edition of four in 1911.

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Art, Design, Artefacts

Al-Shaheed Monument
Posted
Tuesday, 11.03.2014

The al-Shaheed Monument, also known as the Martyr's Memorial, is a monument in the Iraqi capital Baghdad dedicated to the Iraqi soldiers who died in the Iran-Iraq war. The Monument was opened in 1983, and was designed by the Iraqi architect Saman Kamal and the Iraqi sculptor and artist Ismail Fattah al-Turk. During the 1970s and 1980s, Saddam Hussein's government spent a lot of money on new monuments, which included the al-Shaheed Monument.

The monument rests on a site comprised of green areas, a children's playground, car parks, walkways and bridges, and a lake. Amid the lake is an island of two circular platforms - one above the other - on which the monument is set. The monument is a 40m shell split in two and slided to form an inverted and disjoined S in plan which resembles the domes of the Abbasid era. Inside one of the dome shells is a circular water pool that cascades its contents to the courtyard below. The structure built on two levels under the platform comprises: a museum, a library, a cafeteria, lecture hall, exhibition gallery and support facilities. The shells are constructed of a galvanised steel frame with glazed ceramic tile cladding pre-cast in carbon fiber reinforced concrete.

ceramics, elizabeth fritsch potter

Art, Design, Artefacts

Branden Collins
Elizabeth Fritsch Potter
Posted
Friday, 17.01.2014

Elizabeth Fritsch Potter is born in Shropshire, England. She studied at the Royal Academy of Music prior to attending the Royal College of Art, Ceramics (1968-71). Later in 1985 she established a workshop in London.

Since the 1970s she has been one of the leading figures in British ceramics. She makes hand built vessel forms with strong architectonic qualities, which she prefers to show in subtly arranged groups designed to highlight the geometric shapes and decoration. She studied harp and piano at the Royal Academy of Music (1958-1964) but eventually took up ceramics working under Hans Coper at the Royal College of Art (1968-1971).

She was one of a group of outstanding women ceramicists who emerged from the RCA in that period. Her ceramic vessels are carefully coil-built stoneware smoothed and refined into sharply profiled shapes. They are decorated with dry matt slips, in colours unusual for ceramics; the early work uses pale colours, then for a number of years she used stronger blues and green and more recently she has turned to monochrome forms. Although not a prolific artist she has had a number of significant one-person shows over the years and in 1996 was a finalist for the Jerwood Prize for Ceramics. Her work is represented in major collections in Britain and abroad and she is one of the most highly valued contemporary ceramic artists.

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Das Triadische Ballet (The Triadic Ballet)

Art, Design, Artefacts

Das Triadische Ballet (The Triadic Ballet)
Posted
Saturday, 28.12.2013

A ballet developed by German painter, sculptor, designer and coreographer, Oskar Schlemmer. It premiered in Stuttgart, on 30 September 1922, with music composed by Paul Hindemith, after formative performances dating back to 1916, with the performers Elsa Hotzel and Albert Burger.

Franz Schömbs’ The Triadic Ballet (1970) is a reconstruction of the original ballet by Schlemmer, based on the idea of the magic figure three. Costumes, masks and form are modelled on originals but use of modern, almost weightless material that gives the strictly geometrical figures a floating grace. The recreation is accompanied by an introduction to the Bauhaus' aesthetic principles and the artistic work of Oskar Schlemmer.

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Das Triadische Ballet

Das Triadische Ballet (The Triadic Ballet), is a ballet developed by German painter, sculptor, designer and choreographer, Oskar Schlemmer. It premiered in Stuttgart, on 30 September 1922, with music composed by Paul Hindemith, after formative performances dating back to 1916, with the performers Elsa Hotzel and Albert Burger. The ballet became the most widely performed avant-garde artistic dance and while Schlemmer was at the Bauhaus from 1921 to 1929, the ballet toured, helping to spread the ethos of the Bauhaus.

In 1970, Margarete Hasting, Franz Schömbs and Georg Verden recreated the performance which is the film you see here.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Posted
Sunday, 27.10.2013

The long coat and full trousers stamp her as an inheritor of an Eastern culture. The veil has been discarded by many of the Moslem sections of the heterogeneous population of Southern Yugo-Slavia, who, freed from the Turk, have grown accustomed to the sight of Christian women, and now unblushingly expose their features, delighting in the comfort and freedom which this new fashion entail.

From the "Secret Museum of Mankind".

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Craft In The Anthropocene

How will the Anthropocene era redefine raw material and craft ?

Artist, designer & "material teller", Yesenia Thibault-Picazo searches for the answer with a research led project, "Craft In The Anthropocene", that investigates the future of geology and interrogates our evolving relationship with nature.

The Anthropocene era is a new geological epoch evidencing the impact of global civilisation on Earth. The term was coined a decade ago by Paul Crutzen and suggests that humankind has become over time a global geophysical force intertwined with the most powerful forces of nature.

Through our collective actions, we spread specific elements in nature, rare in the pre-human era, which will become prevalent sediments, building up the future planetary strata.

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Gerhard Richter at Work

Gerhard Richter is a German visual artist. Richter has simultaneously produced abstract and photorealistic painted works, as well as photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picasso and Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist's obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Pavel Tchelitchew
Posted
Thursday, 29.08.2013

Russian-born surrealist painter Pavel Tchelitchew became a United States citizen in 1952. Tchelitchew's early painting was abstract in style, described as Constructivist and Futurist and influenced by his study with Aleksandra Ekster in Kiev. After emigrating to Paris he became associated with the Neo-romanticism movement. He continuously experimented with new styles, eventually incorporating multiple perspectives and elements of surrealism and fantasy into his painting. As a set and costume designer, he collaborated with Sergei Diaghilev and George Balanchine, among others.


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david taylor, sweden, concrete, lamps, candles

Art, Design, Artefacts

Craft, Ceramic, Metal: David Taylor
Posted
Thursday, 09.05.2013

Self-proclaimed metal craftsman David Taylor has always created mesmerizing pieces of work which of we will never get tired of. The designer also has great names for his  conceptual pieces too. We especially adore Crowd 2013-13.

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david benjamin sherry

Art, Design, Artefacts

Meet David Benjamin Sherry
Posted
Friday, 03.05.2013

Natural, monochromatic abstraction is how one could describe this young artist's work. At times loud maybe slightly psychedelic, yet we wish paradise would be like his photographies. We might then convert to Christianity.

David Benjamin Sherry: "I think anyone who finds pleasure in the natural world would enjoy seeing these ancient rocks and mountains in surreal colors. I would assume that they would be thrilled that I was inspired by nature; I wouldn’t expect judgment from a nature purist."


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Whatever you do, do something else.

 

Hans Ulrich Obrist, born in 1968, Zurich, Switzerland, lives and works in London, where he is co-director of exhibitions and programs and director of international projects at the Serpentine Gallery. Before that, he was curator of Museum in Progress, Vienna, from 1993 to 2000 and has been a curator at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris since 2000. Obrist has curated and co-curated more than 200 solo and group exhibitions and biennials internationally since 1991.

Obrist is contributing editor of Abitare Magazine, Artforum, and Paradis Magazine.

Podcast

Petro Wotkins, Russian artist, closes the Mumok in Austria creating a commotion the museum would wish to cause with their regular exhibitions.

Listen to this short interview with Petro Wotkins on his motif and advice to the directors of the museum.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Another Something & Company
Posted
Monday, 08.04.2013

Our friend Joachim Baan at Another Something & Co. has updated his platform which is brilliantly coded by Drost & Co. He founded the agency in 2007 and offers brand design, creative direction, fashion initiatives and collaborations.

Another Something & Co. creates and shares a world of beauty and is an inspiration to us. Thank you Joachim.

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Weimar Porzellan, Rose of Weimar

Art, Design, Artefacts

Weimar Porzellan
Posted
Tuesday, 11.12.2012

Established by Christian Andreas Speck in 1790 in Blankenheim, Germany, with a debut exhibition at the Leipzig Fair, Weimar Porzellan remains a stalwart in the elegant production of “white gold”. Even the great poet and privy councellor Johann Wolfgang von Goethe lauded the fine china when he remarked in a letter to Mrs. von Stein: “… The porcelain is very fine, better than what they make not far from here and yet it sells for a better price.”

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Gorget, Peter Finer

Art, Design, Artefacts

The Redcoats are Coming
Posted
Friday, 29.06.2012

Beaten from a single piece of fine, fire-gilded copper, its rim rolled around a length of wire, its tips pierced for suspension by silk ribbons and bearing three silver mounts finely-cast and chased in high relief: the centre-front mount being a representation of the crowned British Royal Shield of Arms of the period 1714-1801 superimposed upon a trophy-of-arms, flags and musical instruments and cannon and the two tip mounts being stylized Classical trophies-of-arms surrounding and descending from the ribbon holes and terminating in laurel wreaths.

Gorgets were the last remaining vestige of armour to be worn by infantry officers and in the British Army they were worn by officers when on duty.  They were a reminder of the first piece of armour to be donned and the last piece to be removed. By the end of the 17th century, when the power of firearms had finally banished armour from the battlefield, the gorget was retained as the symbol of the officer


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Available for purchase at Peter Finer

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7000 Oaks, Kassel, Joseph Beuys

Art, Design, Artefacts

7000 Oaks
Posted
Friday, 20.04.2012

7000 Oaks was a public art project undertaken in Kassel for the inauguration of Documenta 7 in 1982 and which continued five years after under the auspices of the Free International University. A true amalgamation of Beuys’ concept of the social sculpture, the planting of 7000 Oaks was a sculpture referring to people’s lives, to their everyday work. Beuys intention was to be among social problems and problems of nature and thus regenerate the life of humankind and spiritual consciousness of fellow planetarians. The solid stone base – made of basalt, which one can find in the craters of extinct volcanoes – complements the ever-evolving tree and thus represents a basic concept in Beuys’ philosophy, that these two natural yet oppositional qualities are complementary and coexist harmoniously.


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Why I Buy: Art Collectors Reveal What Drives Them

 

What compels one to buy art at all? Why are some satisfied with just looking, while others feel the need to possess?

Read more here.

skeltons, studio job, norway

Art, Design, Artefacts

Necromancy: Studio Job
Posted
Thursday, 08.03.2012

Renaissance Belgian-Dutch duo Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel of Studio Job operate at the flux between art and design. Picking up where the European tradition left off with the advent of the industrial age and mass production, most of their work interrogates relationships of the manmade vs. natural. Though often times dark and brooding, they also have a propensity for the playful and caricitural. With the violence and obscurity of El Greco and droll takes on iconography as Jeff Koons, they are modern day provacteurs who are intrepid in the face of shattering dogmas and challenging taboos. 


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sofa, istanbul, floral, bokja

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Bokja Design
Posted
Wednesday, 07.03.2012

You ain’t seen color yet. That is until you’ve laid your eyes on one of the dynamic designs of Hoda Baroudi and Maria Hibri. With a flair for vintage and antique furniture as well as ancient textiles and tapestries from the Levant and Silk Road, the Beirut-based duo scissor and stitch their way with a ludic touch.

 Each piece is a pastiche of texture and color stories in crazy juxtapositions as the ever eccentric African Wax Prints. All design objects are handmade and reworked by local artisans using  recycled fabrics from regions as far reaching as Samarkand, Aleppo and Istanbul.


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Queen Elizabeth's Jacket
Posted
Wednesday, 11.01.2012

From the Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection

This woman's jacket was possibly worn by Grizell Wodehouse (d. 1635), the wife of Sir Philip Wodehouse. According to family legend, the jacket belonged to Queen Elizabeth and was given as a gift when ...she visited the Kimberly estate in 1578 for the knighting of Roger Wodehouse (d. 1588), Phillip's father. There is no evidence, however, that this provenance is true, particularly since the garment probably dates to after the queen's death.

According to a December 14th, 1941 letter from Elizabeth Day McCormick to Gertrude Townsend, the garment was said to be part of the "Kimberly Collection."


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The Emergence of the Samurai Culture

 

Territorial dominance and the classic strife for land ownership are common geopolitical themes extending across borders since time immemorial.  This is how the Samurai class emerged in eleventh century Japan and came to dominate the region for more than four centuries as the military elite. With vast forested and mountainous ranges occupying the many islands, only 20% has ever been agriculturally sustainable. Considering such scarcity, feudal lords appointed Samurai to defend the land as loyal servants and men of courage who pledged their steadfast honour until the call of death.

Read full article here.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Swiss company Victorinox has become synonymous with reliability and enduring craftsmanship and maintains its lifetime warranty. And here they release yet another edition: Victorinox Tomo.

 

Tomo, Japanese for companion and friend, is the special edition capsule collection, featuring an array of colourful pocket knives designed with a purist, effeminate aesthetic, the reductionism of wabi sabi and Yamaguchi’s Zen Buddhist influence.

Read full article here.

Art, Design, Artefacts

Posted
Sunday, 20.11.2011

Hearkening back to our forbears, weaponry in pre-historic times was a direct product of our environment: spears made of flint or bone, ligneous bows and arrows and stone slings reinforced with vine or hide. From the time of the Assyrians and Babylonians to the Trojan War upheaval, it was ca. 3300-1200 BC when the copper and bronze age came into prominence with all its advanced implements as copper stabbing swords and protective battle armour.

Read full article here.


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The Ancient Art of Kirigami

 

“Modern Art Cutting” is Victorinox’s take on the ancient art of Kirigami, an offshoot of origami that involves cutting paper into intricate patterns. In collaboration with London-based papercutting artist Rob Ryan, the Victorinox Tomo was put to the test in creating a specially commissioned artwork using the classic blade.  In true Victorinox spirit, Ryan created an elaborate family tree paper cut drawing, embodying the idea that from generation to generation knives are passed down to offspring as enduring legacies.

If you’d like to put your creative skills to work, there are currently three designs downloadable as stencils.

Read full article here.

Book of Five Rings

 

“There is timing in the whole life of the warrior, in his thriving and declining, in his harmony and discord. Similarly, there is timing in the Way of the merchant, in the rise and fall of capital. All things entail rising and falling timing. You must be able to discern this.”

Samurai warrior Miyamoto Musashi wrote a book on the art of the sword (kenjutsu) discussing that battle can be divided into the five essences of Buddhism: earth, water, fire, wind and void. He covers leadership and training, technique, timing, spirituality and consciousness.

Read full article here.

Victorinox Tomonox Tomo

Art, Design, Artefacts

Schweizer Dolch and the Japanese Tanto
Posted
Tuesday, 08.11.2011

Now what is the difference between a Schweizer Dolch and a Japanese Tanto?

The dagger, mainly used as a thrusting or stabbing weapon, was also used for many ceremonial and ritualistic events often decorated with iconic regalia and ornate designs. The Scottish dirk believed to be a derivation from the Germanic Dolch was especially worn during formal occasions.

In Japan, Samurai were expected to commit suicide (seppuku) if they performed a disloyal act, if their master was killed in battle or even if they were defeated in the face of an enemy. The weapon of choice was the Japanese dagger (tanto) and the sacrificial act entailed an elaborate cut to the stomach, which was believed to be the seat of the soul.


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