Qompendium is an evolving and ever-changing platform for philosophy, art, culture and science, represented by a series of print publications: magazines, books and monographs. Furthermore, it is enriched by a gallery concept, a work shop and a fast-moving online portal.


Qompendium Trivial


Too real for the Clarendon filter

vtol lilium

Science

The world’s first electric VTOL
Posted
Thursday, 22.06.2017

Lilium was founded in 2015 by Daniel Wiegand and three fellow-academics from the Technical University of Munich. The group shared a vision of a completely new type of transportation. In less than two years, Lilium has grown from the founding team to a company of more than 40 world-class engineers, developing and building the first fully electric vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) jet. With an estimated range of 300 km, a maximum cruising speed of 300 km/h, and zero emissions, the Lilium Jet will be the most efficient and environmentally friendly means of high speed transportation. With ultra-redundancy by design, the Lilium Jet is also setting new standards in aircraft safety.

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Science

Penisneid

 

Penis envy (German: Penisneid) is a stage theorized by Sigmund Freud regarding female psychosexual development, in which young girls experience anxiety upon realization that they do not have a penis. Freud considered this realization a defining moment in a series of transitions toward a mature female sexuality and gender identity. In Freudian theory, the penis envy stage begins the transition from an attachment to the mother to competition with the mother for the attention, recognition and affection of the father. The parallel reaction of a boy's realization that women do not have a penis is castration anxiety.

Science

How NASA Treats Social Media Like a Space Mission

 

NASA’s social media is out of this world. We look at how NASA creates engaging content to take us further and closer to space than ever before.

If social media was the universe, NASA would have been to every planet by now, and set up a base on each one.

Whenever we look at brands, NASA almost always snags a spot in our best examples, and with good reason too. The engagement numbers are consistently extraordinary. So how has NASA made itself a formidable publisher in its own right?

Read more here.

Science

Forget everything.

 

Forget everything.
The internet of things revolutionizes the culture.
It’s not about viral.
Virtual reality is the new pain point.

Science

Useful Science

 

Get an overview of interesting and useful science facts with links to unabridged sources. Just great. We wish it was our idea.

Here is what Malcolm Gladwell says: "A group of Canadian grad students have created a website that elegantly summarizes scientific findings. It's genius."

Now go and subscribe their curated newsletter.
www.usefulscience.org

nasa, blackest black

Science

The Blackest Black
Posted
Thursday, 05.11.2015

UK firm Surrey NanoSystems produces Vantablack, the current record holder for the least-reflective material.

 "There are probably 50 shades of black, if not more. But sometimes, and especially where physicists are concerned, even the blackest black isn’t black enough.

For many years, NASA has used a black paint manufactured by the international aerospace corporation Lord that has a reflectivity of just 3.5%. That’s several per cent lower than conventional black pigments. Dubbed Z306, it was applied to the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as other NASA instruments, to reduce stray light from the Sun, Moon, Earth and indeed the telescope’s own housing. Without it, all those images of distant galaxies and novae might not have appeared quite so spectacular."

Read full article on Physicsworld

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Science

Édouard-Henri Avril

 

Édouard-Henri Avril (21 May 1849 – 28 July 1928) was a French painter and commercial artist. Under the pseudonym Paul Avril, he was an illustrator of erotic literature.

Born in Algiers, Avril studied art in various Paris salons. From 1874 to 1878 he was at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. Having been commissioned to illustrate Théophile Gautier's novel Fortunio, he adopted the pseudonym Paul Avril. His reputation was soon established and he received many commissions to illustrate both major authors and the so-called "galante literature" of the day, a form of erotica. These books were typically sold in small editions on a subscription basis, organised by collectors.

Avril illustrated such works as Gustave Flaubert's Salammbô, Gautier's Le Roi Caundale, John Cleland's Fanny Hill, Jean Baptiste Louvet de Couvray's Adventures of the Chevalier de Faublas, Mario Uchard's Mon Oncle Barbassou (scenes in a harem), Jules Michelet's The Madam, Hector France's Musk, Hashish and Blood, the writings of Pietro Aretino, and the anonymous lesbian novel Gamiani. His major work was designs for De Figuris Veneris: A Manual of Classical Erotica by the German scholar Friedrich Karl Forberg.

Avril died at Le Raincy in 1928.

Playboy, Penthouse and Lui

 

Playboy, which at one time sold almost six million copies a month in the United States, now sells about a million, according to the Alliance for Audited Media. Penthouse, which sold nearly five million copies, sells about 100,000. The biggest of the newer magazines, a venerable French publication called Lui, has sold as many as 350,000 in France.

Read full article here.

Science

Alan Turing

 

Alan Mathison Turing, 23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954, was a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, philosopher, pioneering computer scientist, mathematical biologist, and marathon and ultra distance runner.

He was highly influential in the development of computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.

 

Science

How is a genius different from a really smart person?

 

Nautilus brings together Richard Hunter, Jack Williams, LaRae Bakerink, Bikram Rana and John Sheehan all exceptional intelligent individuals who have scored above the 98th percentile on a IQ test to discuss about the difference between a genius to that of a smart person.

Read full article here.

 

Science

Give Mouse a Brain

 

Mice that receive a human version of a speech and language gene display accelerated learning, according to a new study. Don't expect these findings to lead to a rush of smarter, "uplifted" animals—though they might just reveal something new and fascinating about the evolution of human speech and language.

Read full article here.

axel hoedt

Science

The Ingenious Axel Hoedt
Posted
Monday, 20.10.2014

It is an infinite pleasure to have our Q&A answered by the ingenious Mr. Axel Hoedt – a citizen of Freiburg im Breisgau as being born there in 1966. He studied photo design at the University of Applied Sciences Bielefeld and since 1999 he made the decision to live and work in London. Needless to say that he has been awarded a multitude of top notch awards in the field of photography. His work is meticulously choreographed yet the viewer would not be able to grasp the setting at first sight; there is always a thin line between a portrait and a documentary, between art and reality, between the surreal and the fiction.

Read entire Q&A here.


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S. T. Eliot

 

We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.

Science

It is through mathematics that we can hold not one but an infinity of infinities in the palm of our hand, for all of eternity.

 

Ashutosh Jogalekar is a chemist interested in the history and philosophy of science. He considers science to be a seamless and all-encompassing part of the human experience.

Science

John Bannister Goodenough

 

John Bannister Goodenough (born of U. S. parents in Jena, Germany, 25 July 1922) is an American professor and prominent solid-state physicist. He is currently a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the University of Texas at Austin. He is widely credited for the identification and development of the Li-ion rechargeable battery as well as for developing the Goodenough-Kanamori rules for determining the sign of the magnetic superexchange in materials.

Science

The man who imagined the Internet in 1895

 

Everything in the universe, and everything of man, would be registered at a distance as it was produced. In this way a moving image of the world will be established, a true mirror of his memory. From a distance, everyone will be able to read text, enlarged and limited to the desired subject, projected on an individual screen. In this way, everyone from his armchair will be able to contemplate creation in its entirety or in certain of its parts.

Paul Otlet

Science

N55

 

N55 has its own means of production and distribution.
Manuals for N55 things are published at www.N55.dk and in the N55 periodical. Furthermore, N55 things are implemented in various situations around the world, initiated by N55 or in collaboration with different persons and institutions.

All N55 works are Open Source provided under the rules of Creative Commons as specified here.

For further reading.

Science

N55
Posted
Monday, 17.03.2014

Based in Copenhagen, N55 is an art collective that uses art as their platform to explore reforms in social design through engineering. The "No Borders" campaign, one of their many initiatives, aims to eliminate all borders around the world and to declare the earth a currently threatened resource that is the the common inheritance of all people.

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flat, universe, nasa

Science

Posted
Saturday, 28.12.2013

The Universe is flat...maybe, is the more widely held theory among physical cosmologists based on recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) measurements. "We now know that the universe is flat with only a 0.4% margin of error", say NASA scientists.

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Science

Botulism

 

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and sometimes by strains of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii. There are five main kinds of botulism. Foodborne botulism is caused by eating foods that contain the botulinum toxin. Wound botulism is caused by toxin produced from a wound infected with Clostridium botulinum. Infant botulism is caused by consuming the spores of the botulinum bacteria, which then grow in the intestines and release toxin. Adult intestinal toxemia (adult intestinal colonization) botulism is a very rare kind of botulism that occurs among adults by the same route as infant botulism. Lastly, iatrogenic botulism can occur from accidental overdose of botulinum toxin. All forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies. Foodborne botulism is a public health emergency because many people can be poisoned by eating a contaminated food.

Find out more here.
More information here.

Video

Lunette: The Cup

Maybe a tabu theme or maybe categorized as boring? Maybe it is only for women? If we can go to cloth diapers for babies we can also rethink menstrual cycles and tampons.

In average a woman uses up to 17.000 pads or tampons during her lifetime. The resulting waste amounts to a global annual of 45 billion feminine hygiene products and it creates not only an ecological but also a health problem: bacteria, imbalance of vaginal flora and bad odor to name a few.

The first reaction to the word „menstrual cup“ is usually something between disbelief and repulse. But it shouldn't be. This little invention dates back to the 1930s. Now it makes a big come back by the Finns. Lunette is biodegradable, healthy and sin free.

More information on www.lunette.com





 
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